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In boys’ lacrosse, a typical full-scale game features one goalie, three defenders,three midfielders, and three attackers. The skills that are required to play these positions are as different as the kids who will be manning them for you. Starting from your own goal and working out, the following section outlines each position in boys’ lacrosse.

GOALIE

This player positions himself between the goal posts, and his top responsibility is to stop the ball from going into the net. Good hand-Replace the en dash with a hyphen because it’s a compound modifier?eye coordination and quick reflexes are musts for faring well in this position, because the goalie faces shots from all angles and at varied speeds.

Along with defending the net, goalies are counted on to perform other tasks, including the following:

  • Communicating with the defense: When the team is defending an attack, the goalie must communicate to his teammates what is unfolding on the field (because the goalie has the best view of the field). He can also warn his teammates when picks are being set.
  • Fueling the offensive attack: When your goalie stops a shot, he should be looking upfield to see whether a teammate is available to receive a clearing pass that begins an attack, catching the opponent out of position.

DEFENDERS

These players typically don’t receive as much recognition as the attackers and midfielders because they aren’t directly involved in the plays that produce the goals. But no matter how good your offense is at netting goals, if the team struggles at the defensive end of the field, it probably won’t have a lot of success on game day.

Because a team must keep at least four players (including the goalie) on its defensive half of the field at all times, defenders rarely stray past midfield. Instead, their responsibilities include covering opposing players on the attack. Defenders rely on good footwork to shadow opponents all over the field, and they use a variety of checks. Good passing skills also enable defenders to ignite attacks by getting the ball to their midfielders and attackers running down the field.

MIDFIELDERS

Lacrosse is a sport of fast-paced transitions, and the midfielders’ effectiveness on transitions has a big influence on the team’s effectiveness on both offense and defense. Since midfielders cover the most territory of any position — they roam all over the field — the quicker they recognize situations, the more effective they’ll be. For example, when a midfielder anticipates a teammate gaining control of the ball, the player can begin moving toward the opponent’s goal to try to create a scoring opportunity.

Midfielders typically aren’t counted on to provide a lot of scoring punch. The more important qualities for this position are good stick skills, accurate passing skills, and the stamina to stick with opposing attackers.

ATTACKERS

The responsibility for scoring goals falls on the attackers, who spend games roaming in the opponent’s half of the field. Attackers must rely on the defenders to stop the opposition and the midfielders to feed them the ball.

The most productive attackers have more moves than a disco dancer. They must be able to spin free to score when they’re closing in on the opponent’s goal and defenders are bumping and stick-checking them.

What did Coach say?

A lot of terms are used in lacrosse and it can be confusing, particularly for folks new to the game.  Below are  some of the more common terms and their meanings:
CRADLING: To help maintain control of the ball while running or dodging, a player will turn his top wrist and arm (i.e., cradle) to force the ball into the back of the pocket.
CLEARING: Running or passing the ball from the defensive half of the field to the offensive half.

CREASE: The circle around the goal that has a nine-foot diameter and which only the goalie and players on defense can enter.

CUTTING: Where a player without the ball darts to a teammate with the ball to receive a pass.

FACE-OFF: Occurs at the beginning of each quarter and after a goal and involves two opposing players squaring off against each other at the center of the midfield line. The ball is placed on the ground between the players' sticks and, on the whistle, they fight to gain possession of the ball.

FAST BREAK:  Occurs when the offense has a man advantage and is breaking towards the goal. It typically involves a 4-on-3 situation and provides an excellent scoring opportunity.

FEED:  This term is typically used to describe what happens when an offensive player with the ball passes to (or "feeds") a teammate who is cutting to the cage.

GLE: Short for "goal line extended," which is an imaginary line that extends straight out from both sides of the goal line.

INTERFERENCE:  A player will be called for interference if he does not stay stationary when setting a pick against an opponent who does not have the ball.

MAN-DOWN: When a player is in the penalty box because he committed a penalty, his team than has to play man-down (or with one less player) against the other team, which in turn is then playing "man-up."

MAN-UP: When a team has a man advantage because the other team has a player sitting out because he committed a penalty.

PICK:  A pick occurs when a player without the ball positions himself so that an opposing player is blocked from covering or defending against his man. The player setting the pick must stay stationary during the pick or else he will be called for interference.

RIDING: When the offensive team loses possession of the ball it then must play defense (or ride) against the clearing team in an attempt to stop them from clearing the ball to their offensive half of the field.

SLIDING: When a player on offense dodges past the guy playing defense against him one of his teammates on defense must shift his position or "slide" to help pick up the offensive player to stop him from getting to the goal.

SEPYLA Rules

SEPYLA RULES 2018 updated 2/26/18 

 

Regular Season Rules of SEPYLA That Apply To All Divisions

  • Teams have 2 Time Outs in each half.
  • In the event of a tie game at the end of regulation, we play one 4 Minute sudden victory over time period.  The game ends in a tie if no one scores in the one overtime period (Regular Season Only).   Teams have 1 Time Out in overtime.
  • The 6 goal mercy rule applies once a team is leading by 6 or more goals at all A and B levels, except A3 and B3 level.  4 goal mercy rule applies at all other levels.  THIS IS AN OPTION FOR THE TEAM THAT IS DOWN (6 or 4+) GOALS.  There will be a face off to start each period, even if the mercy rule is in effect.

 

***SEPYLA will follow U.S. Lacrosse (“USL”) Rules and have “12 goal running clock” at all levels. If delta reaches 12 goals or greater, than a running clock goes into effect.  Should the differential become 11 goals or less then we will resume a “stop clock”.***

  • All penalties are served in all Divisions.  All players must serve their own penalties.  With respect to fouls called on a Goalie - if 2 (two) Goalies are present for the fouling team, the Goalie will serve his foul: if only 1 (one) Goalie is present, your team’s "in-home" will serve for your Goalie. This will be followed for both technical and conduct fouls.  EXCEPTION, If one goalie is present, and foul is is 2 minutes or greater at discretion of referee, that goalie will be required to serve penalty and opposing team will have to “dress” another player as goalie during penalty.  The player replacing the goalie must be properly equipped with regulation goalie equipment.
  • All spectators must remain on the opposite side of the field of the players and coaches.
  • The “Home” team shall supply responsible adults for both the game and penalty clocks.  Coaches will not keep game or penalty time clocks.
  • Players must stand in the bench area during the game (unless there is not sufficient sideline space for a bench area).
  • Both teams must have a properly equipped goalie on the field at all times per USL Rule 1 Section 9, this includes elbow (arm) pads.
  • SEPYLA will follow the USL language and penalties (USL Rule 5) on body checks at ALL levels.
  • USL Rules – These rules will be followed for 2018 season, as well as USL adopted changes.  The only exception to this is the use of a long pole at the C level as outlined below.
  • Only balls approved by NOCSEA will be permitted to be used in SEPYLA games.
  • New for 2018: (Experimental Rule adopted 2/26/18:)  Attack and Defensive In-Home Players Teams will nominate a starting defensive player and starting attack player as in-home. Defensive in-home players are used if a goalie commits a foul and their teams do not have another properly equipped goalie to be a replacement. In this case, the goalie can remain in the game and the nominated in-home will serve the goalie’s penalty
  • We will follow the USL Face-off rules in 2016 and beyond.
    • FACEOFFS:  NO TAPE IS REQUIRED FOR THE FACEOFFPLAYERS STICK
  • Horns for substitutions are allowed on all balls that go out of bounds on the side lines.
  • NO 1 handed stick checks are permitted in any SEPYLA games.
  • New for 2018: A goal shall be counted as long as the ball has been released from the players stick prior to the expiration of a period. (adopted 2/26/18)
  • New for 2018: Contact of any degree made to an opponent head while actively making a stick check is a slashing penalty. (adopted 2/26/18)
  • New for 2018: Spectators in addition to players, coaches, and team personnel can cause a time-serving unsportsmanlike penalty. (adopted 2/26/18)
  • New for 2018: The second and subsequent violations by a team when their defensive player enters the crease and assumes the position of a goalie shall result in a releasable unsportsmanlike penalty served by the offending player. 2017 US LACROSSE (adopted 2/26/18)
  • New for 2018: When stalling rules are applied, they will remain in effect until a shot hits the goal pipe, goalie, or the goalie’s equipment in addition to the existing rules for stopping a stall warning. (adopted 2/26/18)
  • New for 2018:  We are adopting NFHS rule on slow whistle (7-8)  When there is a flag down during a slow whistle situation, the attacking team is no longer required to keep the ball in the goal area, otherwise known as " the attack box." A normal stalling situation can still be applied by officials if needed.

 

A Level Rules (For the sake of cross reference these will be considered U14 Rules.)

  • 10 Minute Stop Time Quarters
  • We will follow the USL Rules 4.11, 20 and 10 counts for clearing and getting in the box.
  • Teams that are leading must keep the ball in the offensive box during the last 2 minutes of the game.
    • If a team is winning by 5 goals or more, they will not be required to keep it in during the last two minutes.
  • Short Poles may be 40” to 42” and Long Poles may be 52” to 72”.
  • No 1 Handed Stick Checks are permitted
  • No excessive body checks permitted.
  • Horns for substitutions are allowed on all balls that go out of bounds on the side lines.

 

B Level Rules For the sake of cross reference these rules will be considered U12

  • 10 Minute Stop Time Quarters
  • We will follow the USL Rules 4.11, 20 and 10 counts for clearing and getting in the box.
  • Teams that are leading must keep the ball in the offensive box during the last 2 minutes of the game.
    • If a team is winning by 5 goals or more, they will not be required to keep it in during the last two minutes.
  • Short Poles may be 40” to 42” and Long Poles may be 52” to 72”.
  • No 1 Handed Stick Checks are permitted
  • No excessive body checks permitted.
  • Horns for substitutions are allowed on all balls that go out of bounds on the side lines.

 

C Division Specific Rules (For the sake of cross reference these will be considered U10 Rules.)

 

  • 10 Minute Stop Time Quarters
  • There is NO 20 second count for clearing and NO 10 second count for advancing the ball on offense.
  • Teams that are leading do NOT have to keep the ball in the offensive box during the last 2 minutes of the game.
  • NO body checks are permitted in the C Division.
  • 5th graders (or any grade older) are never permitted to play in a C Division game.
  • Horns for substitutions are allowed on all balls that go out of bounds on the side lines & end lines
  • Short Poles may be 37” to 42” and Long Poles may be a maximum of 54”
  • No 1 Handed Stick Checks are permitted

 

 

Referee Fees:  Please make sure that the referees are paid prior to the start of the game

A1, A2 and A3:                     $65 each for 2 referee/ $90 for 1 referee (We should never have 1 referee in “A” games).

B1, B2, B2 and C:      $65 each for 2 referee/ $90 for 1 referee

 

Below are Rules that will be emphasized to promote safety in the game at ALL Levels.

 

Illegal Body-Check

US Lacrosse calls special attention to USL Appendix 1 , ILLEGAL BODY-CHECK, ARTICLE 4, which addresses the concept of a DEFENSELESS PLAYER:

ART. 4 . A body-check that targets a player in a defenseless position. This includes but is not limited to: (i) body checking a player from his “blind side”; (ii) body checking a player who has his head down in an attempt to play a loose ball; and (iii) body checking a player whose head is turned away to receive a pass, even if that player turns toward the contact immediately before the body check.

PENALTY: Two- or three-minute non-releasable foul, at the official’s discretion. An excessively violent violation of this rule may result in an ejection.

US Lacrosse NOTE: Sports medicine research indicates that the severity of certain injuries may be reduced if a player can anticipate and prepare himself for an oncoming hit. Other sports medicine research indicates that peripheral vision may not be fully developed in many boys before approximately age fifteen. Game officials should be especially alert to blind side checks at all youth levels.

 

Checks Involving the Head/Neck

RULE 5 SECTION 4

US Lacrosse calls special attention to USL Appendix 1, CHECKS INVOLVING THE HEAD/NECK:

ART. 1 … A player shall not initiate contact to an opponent’s head or neck with a cross-check, or with any part of his body (head, elbow, shoulder, etc.). Any follow through that contacts the head or neck shall also be considered a violation of this rule.

ART. 2 … A player shall not initiate an excessive, violent, or uncontrolled slash to the head/neck.

ART. 3 … A player, including an offensive player in possession of the ball, shall not block an opponent with the head or initiate contact with the head (known as spearing).

PENALTY: Two- or three-minute non-releasable foul, at the official's discretion. An excessively violent violation of this rule may result in an ejection.

 

TAKE-OUT CHECK/EXCESSIVE BODY-CHECK. Take-Out Checks/Excessive Body-Checks are prohibited at every age level. A Take-Out Check/Excessive Body-Check is defined as:

  1. a) Any body-check in which the player lowers his head or shoulder with the force and intent to put the other player on the ground.
  2. b) Any body-check considered more aggressive or more physical than necessary to stop the advancement of the player carrying the ball or to keep or move a player away from a loose ball. This includes but is not limited to: (i) any check in which a player makes contact with sufficient force and intent to knock down the opposing player; (ii) any check in which a player makes contact with sufficient force and intent to injure the opposing player; and (iii) any check made in a reckless or intimidating manner.

PENALTY: Two- or three-minute non-releasable foul, at the official’s discretion. An excessively violent violation of this rule may result in an ejection.

 

One Handed Checks:

USL Appendix 1, Slashing, Article 4:   Any one-handed check shall be considered a slash, whether or not it makes contact with the opposing player. NOTE: If the defensive player’s hand comes off his stick in his legitimate follow-through motion after, or during his recovery from, a controlled poke check, this need not be considered a slash solely because his hand came off the stick.

 

Goalie Equipment:

US Lacrosse has required that all goalies wear a protective cup.  SEPYLA will enforce this rule.

 

Get It In / Keep It In / Stalling:    There is no stalling penalty, However, if a team is making no effort to move the ball into their offensive half of the field, by clearing the ball, and the ‘riding team’ is making every effort to actively play the ball, then at the discretion of the referee an unsportsmanlike penalty can be assessed resulting in a change of possession.at the Officials discretion.  The same holds true in the offensive zone is the offensive team is not making an effort to advance the ball to make a shot on net.